Sunday, June 6, 2010

Ance and Pimples In Dogs and Other Pets

Did you know that common household pets can get pimples and acne just like humans can? Here read this article from petcare.suite101.com its interesting!

"Acne can affect pets of all species and ages, and diagnosing and treating these skin lesions in a timely manner can promote healing, while lessening the chance for the formation of serious and painful infections like abscesses.

According to Dr. Michael Levine, DVM, acne comes in two common forms. The more traditional pimple forms when dirt, bacteria or dead skin cells block a pore, leading to inflammation and infection. The sebaceous cyst forms when a skin pore or hair follicle is blocked, leading to the accumulation of sebum, an oil that keeps the skin moist and supple. The sebum cannot escape, so it builds up beneath the skin’s surface.

Pimples are often seen alongside blackheads in pets, which occur when oils accumulate inside a pore. Oxidation occurs when the oils come in contact with the air, resulting in a “black” appearance in the pore.

Common locations for pimples in pets include the face, muzzle and under on the cat or dog's chin. Oils from foods and dirt from sniffing and exploring the world can clog pores, leading to a bout of acne. Plastic food bowls are also notorious for triggering break-outs in pets, as minute scratches in the plastic’s surface harbor bacteria which is then transferred to the pet’s face during meal time.

The stomach and chest are also common areas for the formation of pimples and cysts in dogs, cats and other pets, as the thin fur in these areas, combined with the close proximity to the ground, allows for easy contamination of the skin’s surface which in turn leads to pore and follicular blockages. Pimples are often more easily noticed on the chest and stomach due to the thinner fur in these regions.

Puppies and other juvenile animals are often more prone to developing acne than adults, as hormones are also believed to play a factor.

Frequent bathing is another common cause of cysts and pimples in pets. The shampoo strips the skin of its natural oils, triggering an increase in oil production, which results in clogged pores, follicles and infection.

Cysts and pimples in pets vary in terms of their treatment. Pimples are generally small pockets of infection that will develop and begin draining relatively quickly and without much intervention, aside from daily washings and disinfecting. Redness and swelling is common at the site.

Cysts, on the other hand, can grow quite large and do not always drain on their own. Many require repeated lancing and draining, and during this process, infection is common, only compounding the situation. If infection is not present, the vicinity of the cyst – filled with a thick paste the consistency of toothpaste – will not necessarily be red or swollen.

Once a large cyst drains and heals, the site will be prone to cyst formation again in the future due to the pore/follicle damage that resulted from the initial cyst. So removal of the damaged tissue is often necessary to avoid repeated cyst formation problems in pets."

Another cool thing about the article is that is explains that puppies and other juvenile animals are often more prone to developing acne than adults, because hormones are believed to be a factor! This is cool because it is the same way with humans and puberty!

Anyways hope you guys enjoyed!

-Jpc

11 comments:

  1. Hi Jpc,

    Thank you for sharing that we are not the ones that suffer from acne...

    -Jonathan

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  2. Hi Jpe,
    My little teacup Maltese has what I believe to be a pimple as I searched if it were possible. Clear as day, I know now, but what can I do to get rid of the pimple. I tried to squeeze it but it doesn't pop like human zits. Please help me I'm freaking out everyday trying to think of remedies to help rid him of this nasty pimple.

    -Leah

    ReplyDelete
  3. My Labrador has acne and I thought that it was just a simple "bump". Thanks to your article, I now realize that this is indeed a pimple! I think it's her shampoo so I'm going to change it this week in order to prevent future outbreaks. I've been to the vet and she also prescribed supplements that are rich with salmon oil and Omega fatty acids. I do hope these works and am making sure that I'm giving her the right nutrition, as well. Here's a great site that I've stumbled into that tells how to treat dog pimples. Hop on to http://dogsaholic.com/care/dog-pimples.html

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